Homeland Security and Emergency Services

Ebola First Responders, EMS, PSAP

Interim Guidance for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems and 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) for Management of Patients with Known or Suspected Ebola Virus Disease in the United States

Case Definition for Ebola Virus Disease (EVD)

 

 

Screenings/Evaluations

Evaluating Patients for Possible Ebola Virus Disease: Recommendations for Healthcare Personnel and Health Officials

Early recognition is critical to controlling the spread of Ebola virus. Consequently, healthcare personnel should elicit the patient's travel history and consider the possibility of Ebola in patients who present with fever, myalgia, severe headache, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, or unexplained bleeding or bruising. Should the patient report a history of recent travel to one of the affected West African countries (Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea) and exhibit such symptoms, immediate action should be taken.

Case Definition for Ebola Virus Disease (EVD)

Interim Guidance for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems and 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) for Management of Patients with Known or Suspected Ebola Virus Disease in the United States(CDC)

Screening of Travelers at Airports (CDC and DHS)

Ebola Screening for EMS, PSAP

 

Guidelines

Guidelines for Clinicians in U.S. Healthcare Settings

CDC Guidelines for Colleges and Universities

Top 10 Ebola Response Planning Tips: Ebola Readiness Self-Assessment for State and Local Public Health Officials

Protecting Healthcare Workers

U.S. Healthcare Settings

Diagnosis/Testing

Diagnosing Ebola in an person who has been infected for only a few days is difficult, because the early symptoms, such as fever, are nonspecific to Ebola infection and are seen often in patients with more commonly occurring diseases, such as malaria and typhoid fever.

Specimen Collection, Transport, Testing, and Submission