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Emergency Management Certification and Training Program

Overview

The Emergency Management Certification and Training (EMC & T) program has been developed to support Governor Cuomo’s strategy of creating unified emergency management training, education, communication, and response protocols. The program has several components, including standardized emergency management training and a new County Emergency Preparedness Assessment (CEPA) process (see FAQs for more on CEPA).

The training is intended for those with a role in emergency management or disaster response in New York State. DHSES has developed three tiers of training tailored to specific roles.

  • County Chief Executives (Tier 1)
  • County Emergency Managers (Tier 2)
  • Local Public Officials, First Responder Leadership and Other Partners (Tier 3)

All of the training includes the same core components, although the level of detail on some topics may vary depending on the audience. For example, the Chief Executives will receive more detail on the legal authorities and responsibilities of Chief Executives.

Ultimately, the training is intended to benefit the safety of all residents of New York State by ensuring that a uniform, executive-level understanding of the importance of preparedness and response protocols is achieved and routinely refreshed.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Who is required to take the training?

Both the County Chief Executive and the County Emergency Manager must complete the training in order for their Counties to remain eligible for grant funding administered by DHSES. At this point, they are the only individuals DHSES is requiring to take the training for grant eligibility purposes.

What constitutes a County Chief Executive?

As per Article 2B of NYS Executive Law (governing disaster preparedness and response), a County Chief Executive means a County Executive or Manager of a County; or in a County not having a County Executive or Manager, the Chairman or other Presiding Officer of the County Legislative Body;

What about the City of New York?

For the purposes of the EMC & T, the Mayor of NYC and the NYC Emergency Manager must also complete the training, on behalf of the five Counties/Boroughs of the City.

Why do you have training specifically for County Officials, what about other local and private sector emergency management professionals?

County Chief Executives and County Emergency Managers have specific authorities and responsibilities as outlined in Article 2-B of NYS Executive Law, plus Counties serve as the local coordination point for DHSES during emergencies and disaster situations. The Tier 3 program will be open to other emergency management professionals beyond the County level.

What if the County Public Safety Director also serves as the County Emergency Manager, can he or she attend on behalf of the Chief Executive and meet the Tier 1 requirement?

No, he/she cannot receive Tier 1 credit.

Is there an annual requirement?

Annual refresher training will be required for the Chief Executive and County Emergency manger (to include NYC). To the degree possible, DHSES will seek to leverage existing events to deliver the training, to include the annual New York State Emergency Management Association conference.

What will I be “certified” to do after completing the training?

The training will provide you with an understanding of the State’s emergency management framework, to include key programs and concepts, and it will certify to DHSES that you have received this information.

How long is the training?

The length of the training varies depending on the audience. For example, the Tier 1 training is delivered in a day and the Tier 2 training is a multi-day training that will generally be delivered in an academy like setting. The Tier 3 training is still in development and will likely be at least half a day.

How does this training relate to NIMS/ICS training?

The training is intended to complement (not replace) the NIMS/ICS related training required by the US Department of Homeland Security to remain eligible for Federal grant funding. Whereas NIMS/ICS training focuses on national-doctrine and concepts, the EMC Training focuses on the State’s emergency management framework, to include the State Law governing disaster preparedness and response (Article 2-B of NYS Executive Law), and other New York specific programs.   Additionally, the EMC Training is a State training requirement not a Federal training requirement.

How was the curriculum developed?

It was developed based on input from State and local emergency management professionals and in collaboration with the New York State Emergency Management Association (NYSEMA) and the National Center for Security & Preparedness at Rockefeller College, University at Albany (NCSP). The curriculum will evolve over time to ensure it remains relevant and covers all of the key concepts. 

How often is the training offered?

There is no set schedule but the training will be provided on an ongoing basis. DHSES will work to advertise the training to the appropriate stakeholder groups when the training is scheduled. DHSES anticipates at least one academy a year for new Chief Executive and Emergency Managers. The academy will likely include both Chief Executive (Tier 1) and Emergency Managers (Tier 2) and be delivered in a central location, whereas the Tier 3 training will primarily be delivered regionally. DHSES will also look to leverage existing events (e.g., the annual NYSEMA conference) to deliver the EMC training.

How is the training delivered?

The training is delivered in a classroom setting and will include presentations and scenario based discussions.

Is there an on-line option?

No, not at this time.

Why is the training only for local government, what about State agencies?

Due to the grant requirements, DHSES targeted the initial deliveries to local government but we will work to ensure that anyone with a role in emergency management or disaster response (including State Agency personnel) has an opportunity to take the training.

How does the Tier 3 training relate to the Public Officials Conferences previously conducted by DHSES/OEM?

The Tier 3 training leverages the same concept and approach as the Public Official Conferences, to include regional deliveries by DHSES/OEM staff in collaboration with County Emergency Managers. The Tier 3 training includes some standard content but with the ability to customize and/or add content based on the needs of the County. Public Official Conferences are encouraged and will meet the intent of the Tier 3 training, assuming the standard Tier 3 content is included.

Why are you requiring County Emergency Managers to deliver the Tier 3 training?

There is no requirement for County Emergency Managers to deliver the Tier 3 training. However, given that the intended audience includes local public officials and first responder leadership, we think there is great value in a collaborative approach to this training. The goal here is to make the information available to our collective stakeholders and to provide some degree of standard content, which can be further enhanced by the County Emergency Manager to address and specific issues within the County.

Are local public officials and first responders required to attend the Tier 3 training?

No, there is no requirement for anyone to attend the Tier 3 training, but we strongly encourage attendance if possible.

Will the Chief Executive or County Emergency Manager get “credit” for attending the Tier 3 training?

No, the Tier 3 program is targeted at local public officials and others within the County, whereas the Tier 1 and Tier 2 programs have been developed specifically for Chief Executive and County Emergency Managers, so they must attend the Tier 1 or Tier 2 training to receive credit for the purposes of remaining eligible for DHSES administered grant funding.

What is CEPA?

CEPA is an acronym for County Emergency Preparedness Assessment and is a framework and tool to help State and local stakeholders assess risk, capabilities, and the potential need for support and resources during emergencies or disasters. CEPA provides for a standardized and repeatable process to understand capabilities at the County and NYC level and to identify statewide trends. CEPA is a tool to help guide disaster preparedness and response efforts, but it is not intended as a scorecard or ranking system. The key component of CEPA is an in-person meeting between State and local subject matter experts to discuss and analyze local hazard and capability information and potential resource gaps.

What is the status of CEPA?

DHSES is working with NYSEMA to test the current CEPA tool and approach. DHSES is currently pilot testing the tool with a few Counties. 

Who has to participate in CEPA?

Every County in NYS and the City of New York will be required to participate in CEPA to remain eligible for grant funding administered by DHSES. CEPA will be completed through a series of in person meetings across the State, and it is envisioned that CEPA will be an iterative and ongoing process.

What impact will CEPA have on grant funding?

Counties (and NYC) that do not participate in the CEPA process jeopardize their receipt of preparedness grants.  CEPA is not intended as mechanism to award grant funding, although the information obtained from CEPA should help to inform the use of grant funds and other resources to sustain critical capabilities or address capability gaps. DHSES plans to review CEPA trends/findings on a statewide basis to help inform potential new targeted grant programs to address CEPA gaps.

How will Counties be able to use CEPA?

After completing the CEPA assessment, Counties can use the results to educate their elected officials, to justify budget requests, to tailor future programs and resource allocations, and to inform future planning, training, and exercise activities.  Counties can also use the CEPA results to provide a framework for more detailed discussions with DHSES (and other State Agencies) regarding exactly what resources and support the State can offer to best support local government during emergencies.

How will the State use the CEPA information?

The information obtained from CEPA will help the State better plan for and respond to the needs of the Counties. Because the information that will be garnered in the CEPA process could reveal public safety weaknesses, the State will work to protect the information and not share County specific data/information with any other party (including other Counties) unless specific consent is provided.

Who can I contact with additional questions about the EMC & T program?

DHSES has established a dedicated email account for questions about the program. The email address is: EmCertProgram@dhses.ny.gov

Emergency Management Certification and Training Academy

June 23-26

EMC & T Overview

The EMC & T program has been developed to support Governor Cuomo's strategy of creating unified emergency management training, education, communication, and response protocols. The EMC & T program consists of three tiers of training, including training for:

  • County Chief Executives (Tier 1)
  • County Emergency Managers (Tier 2)
  • Local Public Officials, First Responder Leadership and Other Emergency Management Partners (Tier 3)

The County Chief Executive (e.g., County Executive, Chairman of the Board) and the County Emergency Manager must complete the training for their Counties to remain eligible for grant funding administered by the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (DHSES). For the purposes of the EMC & T Program, the City of New York is included to represent the five Counties within New York City

EMC & T Academy

The EMC & T Academy is intended for County Chief Executives (Tier 1) and County Emergency Managers (Tier2). The first day of training is designed to be a joint session for County Chief Executives and County Emergency Managers, with the remainder of the training intended for County Emergency Managers. In total, County Chief Executives will be expected to attend one day (June 23) and the County Emergency Managers will be expected to attend for the full three and a half days (June 23-26).

Important Note: As this is likely the last EMC & T Academy of the year, County Chief Executives and County Emergency Managers that have not yet completed the training, to include those new to their positions, are strongly encouraged to attend to ensure the County continues to remain eligible for grant funding.

Location

The academy will take place at the Holiday Inn located at 205 Wolf Road in Albany, NY 12205.

Participants

Participants must be members of the target audience of County Chief Executives, County Emergency Managers or agencies that serve as members of the NYS Disaster Preparedness Commission.

Counties

Each County can send up two (2) individuals, to include the County Chief Executive and the County Emergency Manager. If these individuals have already completed the training, the County can send other key Executive or Emergency Management staff members. However, due to space constraints, at this time, we must limit each County to only two representatives.

DPC Agencies

Although the Academy is primarily intended for County Chief Executives and County Emergency Managers, the training may be of interest to DPC Agencies as well. To that end, each DPC Agency is welcome to send a representative to the training. Ideally, the representative will be the lead individual responsible for emergency management related activities for your agency. He/she should plan to attend for the full three and a half days of the training. However, due to space constraints, at this time, we can only accommodate one (1) individual per agency.

Topic Covered

Tentative Agenda - Topics to include (but are not limited to):

  • NYS Risk Profile/Leveraging Homeland Security Grant Funds to Build Capability and Reduce Risk
  • Emergency Management in New York State and the Roles of the Chief Executive
  • Article 2B:  The Legal Authority and Responsibilities of Chief Executives
  • Crisis/Disaster Communication
  • Local Lessons Learned/Best Practices
  • The Evolution of Emergency Management and National (and State) Preparedness
  • Severe Weather 101
  • The Terrorist Threat in NYS
  • Responding to the Disaster/Understanding the Process
  • Panel Discussion with NYS DPC Agencies
  • Disaster Recovery
  • Planning for Special Needs/Vulnerable Populations
  • The Psychological Impact of Disasters
  • Continuity of Operations/Continuity of Government
  • Social Media for Emergency Managers
  • Cyber security for Emergency Managers
  • Active Shooter Incident and the Role of the Emergency Manager
  • Disaster Scenario Discussions

Time(s)

Tier 1 - Monday, June 23, 2014
9:00am - 5:30pm

Tier 2 - Monday, June 23, 2014
8:30am - 5:30pm

Tuesday, June 24, 2014
8:30am - 5:30pm

Wednesday, June 25, 2014
8:30am - 5:30pm

Thursday, June 26, 2014
8:30am - 12:30pm

Important Note: registration will begin at 8:00 am on June 23rd. Meals, including breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided at the conference site by DHSES throughout the duration of the agenda.

Costs/Accommodations

There is no cost for the training. DHSES will cover the lodging costs for those traveling more than 35 miles to the conference site.  Although DHSES will cover food and lodging, participants will be responsible for their travel costs to and from the training.

Additional Details

For additional details, including information on the registration process, please email EmCertProgram@dhses.ny.gov

 

William R.
Davis Jr.

Director